Día de los Muertos 101

I know what you’re thinking; however, El Día de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, is not national zombie day. C’mon now! This Mexican holiday is celebrated on November 1st throughout Mexico and Latin America, but who am I kidding? My people learned to travel and have taken this celebration world wide. Families and friends come together on this day to celebrate the life of loved ones who have passed on to the afterlife. We love a good party, especially with spirits! Get it? Get it? Whatever.

Ofrendas, or offerings, are usually set up with photographs, favorite foods, drinks, and music of the deceased. Speaking of food, let’s start with pan de muerto, or bread of the dead. Pan de muerto is a traditional Mexican sweet bread eaten during this celebration. The bread symbolizes the souls of the departed and is shaped in a circle to symbolize the circle of life. Marigolds are considered the flower of the dead. Some people will leave a trail of marigolds from their loved one’s grave to the front door of their house so the deceased are able to find their way home easily. ¿Que qué? It’s true, but I don’t do this.

The calaca, or skeleton, which is beautifully decorated in fancy clothes and vibrant colors is the most popular of symbols on this holiday. The calaca is always depicted lively and joyous but never mournful; this is a celebration after all. We want to dance! ¡Queremos bailar!

Now that you’re all caught up on this Mexican holiday, share the information and check out the pictures below.

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